AMOS 2020 will host a variety of excellent workshops.

Please note that some workshops will be held on the Sunday (09/02/20) and Friday (14/02/20)

 

Workshop: Observational Approaches to Ocean Optics

Sunday, 9 February 10:00am - 5:00pm (TBC)

Description:

Light is of primary importance to the marine ecosystem, so improvements in how we measure and understand light will benefit our understanding of the marine ecosystem.

This workshop will describe the fundamental measurements of light (radiometry) and the inherent optical properties of substances which alter light within a given medium. The workshop will provide a rundown of the types of optical equipment and techniques utilised by researchers for measuring the optical properties of the ocean, which can inform on the availability of light, composition and concentration of particles and biogeochemical constituents, the physiology of photosynthetic organisms and benthic habitats. Example datasets will be provided, as well as practical examples of how this type of data can analysed by computer programs such as Excel, Matlab, R, IDL and Python.

Extra Information:

This workshop will be divided into segments (possibly 4) performed by at least 4 different guest lecturers. Each segment will initially consist of a lecture where the theory is introduced, followed by an optional computer-based laboratory exercise (Students can choose between Excel, Matlab, R, IDL or Python) demonstrating data processing techniques. During this time, the spare lecturers serve as lab demonstrators to answer questions and assist the running of the exercise. Each segment is concluded with a group discussion about the laboratory work and an informal Q+A section about the contents of each segment.

Each segment goes for approximately 2 hours. 45 minute lecture, 15 minute break, 45 minute laboratory exercise, 15 minute Q+A / summary. Attendees wishing to participate in the practical data processing laboratory exercise sections are encouraged to bring their own PC with chosen software data analysis package.

 

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Matthew Slivkoff
matt@insitumarineoptics.com

Other Organisers:
C. Robinson, W. Klonowski, R. Garcia, and D. Antoine


Workshop: How to use weather radar for climate science

Sunday, 9 February 2:00pm - 5:00pm (TBC)

Description:

A 3hr 'BYO laptop' workshop to demonstrate how to access and apply the CLEX Australian Radar Dataset. This newly available dataset on NCI provides a unique observational record of precipitation rate, processes and structures that can be applied for climate science, including long-term climatologies, evaluating simulations and quantifying rainfall processes. Participants of the workshop will gain an understanding of strengthens and limitations of weather weather observations and will be guided through a series of Python notebooks that demonstrate applications.

 

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Joshua Soderholm
joshua.ss11@gmail.com

Other Organisers:
Valentin Louf, Christian Jakok


Workshop: Accessing and using IMOS data for your research

Sunday, 9 February 10:00am - 5:00pm (TBC)

Description:

Since 2006, the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) has been routinely operating a wide range of observing equipment throughout Australia’s coastal and open oceans, making all of its data accessible to the marine and climate science community, other stakeholders and users, and international collaborators. This workshop is to assist the scientific community discover, access, download, use and understand the potential of the data for their research. The workshop will be focused on the use of temperature, salinity and ocean current data from satellites and moored equipment. The intention is to be a hands on guided tutorial that show the use of the Australian Ocean Data Network portal and the tools that are available to analyse the data.

 

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Indi Hodgson-Johnston
indiah.hodgsonjohnston@utas.edu.au

Other Organisers:
Craig Steinberg


Workshop: Creating & delivering policy-relevant climate science

Tuesday, 11 February 2019 - 12:30pm - 2:30pm (TBC)

Description:

This workshop targets climate scientists and researchers that are interested in creating policy-relevant science, and looking to increase the applicability, usability and accessibility of their work to inform government and private sector decision-making. The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE; formerly NSW Office of Environment & Heritage) and the QLD Department of Environment and Science (DES) will provide insights on their end-user needs driven processes, which is instrumental in translating climate change research into useable products that are now informing policy and decision-making at the state level. DPIE and DES collectively are positioned well to achieve this by having climate and weather science capability, knowledge brokerage and advisory functions and a role in government policy development. The workshop will provide guidance on how to translate climate and weather research findings into applicable results for use beyond the scientific community, into sectors such as fire and emergency services, health, transport, and infrastructure. We invite workshop participants to describe what research they are working on now, discuss what impacts and relevance that research might have, and identify potential external collaborators/stakeholders.

Format:

Discussion on current science from participants (30mins), tips and guidance provided through case studies, lessons learned, and good practice examples for establishing collaborations with key stakeholders (45 – 60mins), Q&A (15 - 30 mins).

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Kathleen Beyer, kathleen.beyer@environment.nsw.gov.au

Other Organisers:
Jozef Syktus, jozef.syktus@des.qld.gov.au


Workshop: Cross-cultural communication & climate change

 Tuesday, 11 February 2019 - 12:30pm - 2:30pm (TBC)

Description:

Climate change is having a major impact on Indigenous peoples, their country and culture throughout Australia. Understanding the current and future likely changes is important for Indigenous people planning their futures. At this session, Indigenous people, their partners and science communication practitioners will share experiences in climate science communication. We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches, such as peer-to-peer exchanges, national and local dialogues, Indigenous-led fact sheets and other approaches. We aim to find key insights about what works and why.

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Mandy Hopkins, Mandy.Hopkins@csiro.au

Other Organisers:
Karen Pearce, Melissa Lyne


Workshop: UN Content Expert Contribution Workshop. Climate across the Curriculum: Educational Resources for Teachers

Friday, 14 February 2019 - 9:00am to 1:00pm, Esplanade Hotel Fremantle (TBC)

Description:

TROP ICSU (“Trans-disciplinary Research Oriented Pedagogy for Improving Climate Studies and Understanding”) is a global project funded by the International Council of Science. The project is led by International Union of Biological Sciences (IUBS) and co-led by International Union For Quaternary Research (INQUA). We aim to integrate relevant education and science communication modules in the education system to help future citizens across the globe in improving their understanding of the science of climate change and in developing necessary skills to mitigate its impact. The goal is not to introduce Climate Education as a stand-alone topic, but to integrate it with the core curriculum of Science, Mathematics, and Social Sciences. We collate and curate digital/ICT-based teaching resources that integrate climate studies across the curriculum of Science, Mathematics, Social Sciences and Humanities. These teaching resources are locally rooted in their context, but globally relevant for their science. Our resources, with detailed step-by-step descriptions, are designed and packaged so that teachers in schools and colleges/Universities across the world can use them to: i. introduce examples and case studies from climate science and climate change while enhancing the conceptual understanding of topics in the Sciences, Mathematics, Social Sciences, and other disciplines ii. impart interdisciplinary training that is essential for research on climate change. We invite AMOS attendees to this expert workshop to help contribute to the TROPICSU repository of teaching tools and lesson plans for use in high schools across the world. Some light pre-workshop preparation is required so that experts have chosen potential lesson topics and resources prior to attending. This will also give attendees a chance to browse the TROP ICSU repository for resources which may be useful to them for their own teaching.

Extra Information:

Proposed Workshop format:

  • Introduction to what TROP ICSU is (approx. 1 hr)
  • Teachers describe what is needed in lesson plans and how they think they could benefit from TROP ICSU resources (approx 1 hr).
  • Academics/Researchers break into groups, each with teacher assigned, and develop lesson plans (approx 2 hrs).

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Angela Maharaj
a.maharaj@unsw.edu.au

Other Organisers:

Robyn Schofield, Ian Macadam, David Holmes

 

 

Workshop: Python for Atmosphere and Ocean Science

Sunday, 9 February 2019 - 10:00am to 5:00pm (TBC) Venue TBC

Description:

Python is rapidly emerging as the programming language of choice for data analysis in the weather, climate and ocean sciences. By consulting online tutorials and help pages, most researchers in this community are able to pick up the basic syntax and programming constructs (e.g. loops, lists and conditionals). This self-taught knowledge is sufficient to get work done, but it often involves spending hours to do things that should take minutes, reinventing a lot of wheels, and a nagging uncertainty at the end of it all regarding the reliability and reproducibility of the results. To help address these issues, this Data Carpentry workshop will cover a suite of programming best practices that aren’t so easy to glean from a quick Google search.

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. Participants must already be using Python for their data analysis. They don't need to be highly proficient, but a strong familiarity with Python syntax and basic constructs such as loops, lists and conditionals (i.e. if statements) is required.

When: Feb 10, 2020.

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on. They should have a few specific software packages installed (listed below). They are also required to abide by Data Carpentry's Code of Conduct. 

Extra Information:

The course outline and lesson materials will be available prior to the session.

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Damien Irving
irving.damien@gmail.com

 

Workshop: Climate Science Data Access and Analysis at NCI

Sunday, 9 February 2019 - Times and Venue TBC 

Description:

The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) hosts a large collection of Climate and Weather data, from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) and derived climate model output to observational and reanalysis data. The data is co-located with NCI’s High Performance Computing (HPC) and Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) which provides an interactive environment for data visualisation and analysis. This workshop will provide QnA opportunities while we demonstrate examples on searching and accessing the large volumes of climate science data available at NCI, as well as how to take full advantage of the software and tools available to analyse and process your data. With CMIP6 being a priority, we can prioritise examples on this data, demonstrating the latest tools that have been developed as part of the Climate Science Data Enhanced Virtual Laboratory (DEVL) project. The training materials will cover from basic level to advanced users with a focus on the majority of the attendees’ interests.

Organisers:

Lead Organiser:
Kate Snow
kate.snow@anu.edu.au

Other Organisers:
Jingbo Wang (instructor), Louise Wilson, Paola Petrelli, Claire Trenham, and Aurel Moise